Nursing
Nightingale Statues

Florence Nightingale Awards for Excellence in Nursing

The Florence Nightingale Awards for Nursing Excellence recognize outstanding nurses in the Greater Cincinnati region who go above and beyond to provide exceptional patient care.

2019 Award Nominations

Nominate a nurse or nurse-led interprofessional team to receive a Florence Nightingale Award for Excellence in Nursing. We're accepting nominations through Saturday, Feb. 2.

Individual Award

Individual award recipients will receive $1,000 and a commemorative bust of Florence Nightingale at the 27th annual awards celebration in May.

Team Award

New for 2019! We've added a nurse-led interprofessional team category. Interprofessional collaboration is critical to improving patient outcomes and efficiency, preventing medical errors and increasing patient satisfaction. Eligible interprofessional teams have a nurse leading the cooperation, coordination and collaboration among members of different health care professions working collectively in practice or research.

The winning team will receive $1,000 and a commemorative bust of Florence Nightingale at the 27th annual awards celebration in May.

For more information, contact Shelley Johnson, Program Director of Alumni Relations & College Engagement, at 513-556-6154 or shelley.johnson@uc.edu.

2018 Award Recipients

  • Barb Ehrhardt − University of Cincinnati Medical Center
  • Rita Hartman − TriHealth
  • Stephanie Mackey − TriHealth
  • Monica Smith − Cincinnati VA Medical Center
  • Jeanette Wiedeman − Lindner Center of HOPE
  • Matt Yockey − University of Cincinnati Medical Center

About Florence Nightingale

Florence Nightingale developed the first organized training school for nurses in 1860 in London. The University of Cincinnati College of Nursing, founded in 1889 as the Cincinnati Training School for Nurses, was modeled after the design of the Nightingale Training School for Nurses in London.

This bronze bust given to award recipients is a replica of a gift provided to the college by the great-grandniece of Florence Nightingale, Joan Nightingale Fox. The sculptor, Fr. Jerome Cox, has studios in Florence, Italy, and Minneapolis, Minnesota. A variety of European artists from Fr. Cox's studio collaborated in the development of the bust's hair, cap, and cloak. The statue, presented in 1996, is proudly displayed at the entrance of Procter Hall.