PhD Student & Alumni Spotlights

Within the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing PhD program, you'll have the opportunity to work with outstanding student nurse researchers with a diverse range of research interests and career experiences. 

PhD students
Teresa Getha-Eby

Teresa Getha-Eby

Teresa Getha-Eby recently defended her doctoral dissertation, "Concept-Based Teaching and Meaningful Learning in Associate Degree Nursing Students." Her study was a mixed methods explanatory sequential design study that investigated meaningful learning outcomes of first semester associate degree nursing students at a private nursing college in the Midwestern United States.

Teresa was the recipient of the Beta Iota Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau research grant and the National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing research grant. She currently works as the program director and department chair of the BSN program at the Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Misty Richmond

Misty Richmond

"It is my belief that this work will inform understanding regarding individual psychotherapy, social policy and the human condition/existence in modern society. I sincerely hope to try to make a difference in some of the social ills that I see plaguing American life."

Click here to read Misty's story.

Mohammad Othman

Mohammad Othman

“Early in my nursing education, I set a goal for myself to become a professor in nursing,” says Othman. “I like teaching and I wanted to become a faculty member. I realized that there was a need for a change in the way nursing was perceived in Jordan. A PhD degree seemed a necessity to be in a position that enables achieving these goals.”

Click here to read Mohammad’s story.

Peggy Berry

Peggy Berry

“My focus is the use of workplace bullying towards nurses by nurses with new employees,” says Berry. “I believe our mixed methods study on chronic bullying, my dissertation, will forward some ways of explaining how these behaviors have become embedded in some health care organization culture and continue unrecognized as social norms, initiation rites or structural empowerment issues. My hope and my message is that all employees deserve a psychologically and physically safe work environment.”

Click here to read Peggy’s story.

Tara Konicki

Tara Konicki

“I liked the inquiry courses, which encourage you to use your background and imagination to develop research for dissertation,” says Konicki. “Dr. Beery's courses provide different perspectives and philosophies - many advancements in science come from challenging status quo. I was also introduced to instructional design and think that this should be mandatory for future nursing educators.”

Click here to read Tara's story.

Angela Clark

Angela Clark

Angela Clark is currently evaluating community responses to opioid overdoses for her PhD research study. She is working alongside an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the colleges of nursing and medicine. With over nine years of experience in clinical and public health, Clark has honed her skills at identifying and assessing at-risk communities to provide them with solutions. She was also one of 25 applicants who received the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Summer Genetics Institute (SGI) award.

Click here to read Angela's story.

Cassie Wardlaw

Cassie Wardlaw

“Nursing has been an extremely fulfilling career and I wish I had discovered it sooner,” says current PhD student Cassie Wardlaw. “I knew for a long time that I wanted my PhD but I had no idea how to get there."

Click here to read Cassie's story.

Bunnany Pekar

Bunnany Pekar

"What I have encountered is that not only is nursing a profession of caring but one that is scholarly as well," says Pekar. "While obtaining a PhD provides me with personal fulfillment from being a young Cambodian immigrant to a scholar, it will also provide me with the tools to generate knowledge to improve care and how nursing delivers that care..."

Click here to read Bunnany's story.

Danny Hopgood

Danny Hopgood

Danny Hopgood is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Future of Nursing Scholar and calls himself "fortunate" to receive the mentorship and resources offered by UC College of Nursing. Hopgood plans to study life-saving heart devices for children and how he can improve their quality of life. 

“I started the BSN-PhD program last year, and I feel fortunate for this, because I was able to “zero in” on researching quality of life changes for children who have implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs),” he says. 

Click here to read Danny's story. 

Daniyel Roper

Daniyel Roper

Daniyel Roper had not always intended on becoming a nurse. She started out in the mortgage industry, but through her own personal experiences and insights about the exchange of communication and care between patients and medical providers, decided to not only obtain a degree in nursing, but to pursue research as well.

Click here to read Daniyel's story.

Benjamin Fishback

Benjamin Fishback

Benjamin Fishback is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Future Nursing Scholar who most recently served as an administrator for Heartland Hospice in Cincinnati. During the past five years of working in end-of-life care, he developed an interest on which he will focus his research: hospice use and the African American community.

“I have noticed a disconnect between the hospice philosophy and the needs and desires for end-of-life care in African American culture,” he says. “I believe hospice is a vital service that can greatly improve the difficult transition to death for patients and their families, but also acknowledge that hospice, as it is now, may conflict with dearly-held beliefs.”

Click here to read Benjamin's story.

Sara Burke

Sara Burke

Five years of working in the cardiac intensive care unit at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital fueled Sara Burke’s interest in obtaining a PhD in nursing research after receiving her MSN, which she earned from Xavier University in May of 2015. She considers it an honor to be a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Future Nursing Scholar.

With the desire to determine if certain methods of patient care can improve neurocognitive outcomes, Burke intends to focus her research on caring for the pediatric congenital heart disease patient population. She plans to studyinterventions cardiac intensive care unit nurses can implement to improve neurocognitive outcomes and the quality of life for this patient population.

Read Sara's story here.

Your PhD Story

Could this be your PhD story? Find out by learning more about our PhD program. Click here to receive more information or contact the Office of Student Affairs at nursing1@uc.edu or (513) 558-3600.

Are you already in the PhD program? 

Tell us your story! Contact Marketing at conmarketing@uc.edu so we can share your strides in nursing research.